Rebecca Verses Life

I'm an author of kid lit.
I love words and rhyme
and art
and all things beautiful
and fun.
bethrevis:

Last night, my newsletter subscribers were the first to see the awesome cover for my latest book, The Body Electric designed by IceyDesigns!
What do you think? I love the circuit board background and the bees and bugs bursting from the back of the girl’s head…something deeply symbolic to the book.  

bethrevis:

Last night, my newsletter subscribers were the first to see the awesome cover for my latest book, The Body Electric designed by IceyDesigns!

What do you think? I love the circuit board background and the bees and bugs bursting from the back of the girl’s head…something deeply symbolic to the book.  

When I was in the sixth grade, one of my classmates came to school with a new haircut. It was a lot shorter than it had been, and it looked pretty cute. But then one of my other classmates pointed out that there was a spot in the back that the hairstylist had missed. 

We all looked, and sure enough, there was a section of hair that was a bit longer than the rest. 

New Haircut Girl, who had been relishing in all the attention aimed at her and her new look, was horrified. She then made it a point to tell us all how fat and ugly the man was who had ruined her hair. She made him seem so revolting that we were wondering why on earth she would have let him come close enough to cut her hair in the first place. 

And I suppose that was the point, though we as sixth grade girls didn’t realize it at the time. New Haircut Girl was so upset that her stylist had made a mistake that she felt justified in pointing out what a terrible, ugly hairstylist he truly was.

One might expect this kind of a reaction from sixth grade girls, especially slightly snobby ones who thrive on attention from their peers. But once we grow up shouldn’t we be past that? Shouldn’t we be able to disagree with someone, or even be offended by something they do or say, without stooping to the level of an insecure 12-year-old girl? 

Those middle-school years were challenging enough the first time. Why should we want to live through them all over again?

If you must write in rhyme, don’t be lazy,

for tripping on lines drives me crazy!

Is anything worse

than clunkety verse

or meter that’s fickle or hazy?

I do wish there were more mystery and unanswered questions in children’s books. Sometimes, potentially good books end up being predictable and boring because they play it safe. Everything is overexplained and no risks are taken. Is this because adults, in general, are afraid that children will ask them difficult questions? I fear that’s the main reason, which worries me very much. Many adults forget that if they don’t know an answer, they can just say ‘I don’t know.’

Shawn Welcome - Civil War

Observation: When it comes to controversial issues, too many people rely on emotional manipulation rather than facts. 

If you want to appeal to someone emotionally, at least have your facts straight (and current). Lies and/or misinformation will only hurt your cause.